Archive for the ‘creation’ Category

In the wake of political corruption, lawlessness, God-hating, and evil within the governmental system, other than prayer, what is a Christian to do? Can Christians effectively influence their society for the good of all people, understanding that we wage war not against human flesh, but against principalities, authorites, and rulers of the darkness of this world, and spiritual wickedness in the heavenly realm (Ephesians 6:12)? Yet, human flesh carries out the corruption, the deception, wickedness, and the evil at the command of the Satan, whether implicit or explicit — again, praying as we are fitted with the armor of God (Ephesians 6:10-20), what can a Christian do?

Christian anarchism is a Christian movement in political theology that claims anarchism is inherent in Christianity and the Gospels. It is grounded in the belief that there is only one source of authority to which Christians are ultimately answerable—the authority of God as embodied in the teachings of Jesus Christ. It therefore rejects the idea that human governments have ultimate authority over human societies. Christian anarchists denounce the state, believing it is violent, deceitful and, when glorified, idolatrous.

Christian anarchists hold that the “Reign of God” is the proper expression of the relationship between God and humanity. Under the “Reign of God,” human relationships would be characterized by divided authority, servant leadership, and universal compassion—not by the hierarchical, authoritarian structures that are normally attributed to religious social order. Most Christian anarchists are pacifists who reject war and the use of violence.

More than any other Bible source, the Sermon on the Mount is used as the basis for Christian anarchism. Leo Tolstoy’s “The Kingdom of God Is Within You” is often regarded as a key text for modern Christian anarchism.

I’m thinking about this seriously. As a Christian, what do you think about Christian anarchism?

The first part of the Nicene Creed states, “We believe in one God, Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth and of all things visible and invisible.”

Today is Earth Day, all over the world and here in Minnesota.  God has given humanity the responsibility to care for this earth.  Have we done so?  I don’t think we have.  With the rise of technology, and the knowledge of how to turn rock into steel, we have come to pollute our air and waterways.

From a Christian point of view, life is eucharistic.  The word “eucharist” means thanksgiving.  It is used as the definition of the Sacrament where we receive the body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ.  However, in viewing life and the creation, we must see it all as a Eucharistic celebration.  The celebration is the outcome of being responsible for our earth and all of its contents.

The life we live, and the earth we live on, was a life of communion with God.  When Adam and Eve sinned, we lost the earth as a means of communion with God.  The earth before the fall of humanity was filled with the Divine Presence of God.  Since then, and now, the earth appears void of the Divine Presence. 

The Holy Scriptures tell us that in God “we live, move, and have our being.”  That includes the earth!  When we purposely destroy rain forests that disrupt the ecology; when we purposely shoot pollutants into the air creating holes in the O-Zone layer, we go against the sacramental meaning of our relationship to this planet. 

God gave humanity everything it needed to survive.  God gave us fruit, vegetables, and plants to eat from.  Then, after the fall, and after the great flood of Noah’s time, God allowed us to eat meat.  This isn’t a plug for being vegetarian, but humanity was vegetarian in the beginning.  The killing of an animal is opposed to the understanding of our relationship with the earth and all of creation that God inherently gave us.

Fr. Alexander Schmemann wrote in his book entitled Holy Week: A Liturgical Explanation for the Days of Holy Week, “…world and food, once they are deprived of their initial sacramental meaning as means of communion with God; once they are not received for God’s sake, and filled with hunger and thirst for God; once, in other words, God is no longer their real “content,” can give no life, satisfy no hunger, for they have no life in themselves.”  This is what has become of humanity.  Nothing satisfies, so we go for more.  Nothing gives life, so we think we can create it.  Our hunger and thirst is not for food or that which satisfies, but it is a hunger and thirst for union and communion with God.

As we celebrate “Earth Day” today, let us look to God as our source, as our satisfaction, and the One who fills our hunger and quenches our thirst.  For nothing is more important to the earth today, than our coming back to what was once sanctified; what was once transformed into a world of thanksgiving and adoration of God our Creator.  Let us yearn and repent toward a more perfect eucharistic life, that is filled with God, and watch it become again a Divine and immortal life that He has given to all humanity especially to those who believe in Him.